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Showing posts from December 14, 2014
South Sudan Peace Talks 'Going Nowhere,' Says Atlantic Council ExpertPeace talks aimed at ending South Sudan's civil war are 'going nowhere' because the process is mostly led by countries that are party to the conflict, according to Dr. J. Peter Pham, director of the Atlantic Council's Africa Center.
Senate confirms Murthy as US Surgeon GeneralThe US Senate has confirmed Dr Vivek Hallegere Murthy as the next Surgeon General of the United States of America, despite stiff opposition from the Republican Party and gun-rights advocates.
Isolated from the West, President Putin Visits India The meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi on December 11 sought to re-energize a relationship between two nations which had its peak during the Cold War.
If Ukraine’s Violence Is Not Addressed, Transformation Will Be Slow, Says Top IMF OfficialViolence in southeastern Ukraine could adversely impact the country's economic transformation, Aasim M. Husain, deputy director of the International Monetary Fund's European Department, told the Atlantic Council.
Taliban School Assault Seen Likely to Build Consensus on Fighting Terrorism in Pakistan The killing by Pakistan’s Taliban of more than 140 people, mostly children, at a school is likely to “provide some glue for a consensus [in Pakistan] that you cannot negotiate with terrorist groups,” according to Atlantic Council South Asia specialist Shuja Nawaz. The assault, in northwestern Pakistan, shocked the South Asian nation and drew international condemnation.

In Libya, Push for War Is Stronger Than Push for Peace Meddling by international actors in Libya has undermined a United Nations effort to broker peace in the North African nation, according to Karim Mezran, resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East. 
US Cuba Shift Was Presaged by Poll Showing Americans Were Ready for Change President Barack Obama’s sweeping changes to US-Cuba policy were at least in part influenced by an understanding that this was widely favored among the American people. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center released a poll in February that found support on both sides of the aisle for normalization with Cuba, and this poll has served as a crucial piece of the Cuba policy dialogue.
US Cuba Shift Was Presaged by Poll Showing Americans Were Ready for Change President Barack Obama’s sweeping changes to US-Cuba policy were at least in part influenced by an understanding that this was widely favored among the American people. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center released a poll in February that found support on both sides of the aisle for normalization with Cuba, and this poll has served as a crucial piece of the Cuba policy dialogue.
Coming together for the Syrians Another year draws to a close, but Syria’s civil war — on the brink of entering its fourth year — shows no sign of ending.  Since the start of the conflict in 2011, the war has claimed more than 191,000 lives, according to a United Nations figure that covers the period from March 2011 to April 2014.
While this death toll is staggering, the refugee crisis created by the war is unimaginable.